9/25/15

Ads #78: 1955 Advertising (Part II)


I've never seen a woman so delighted to be in a snowstorm.  Midcentury advertising is always a treat to behold.  Here's a second round from the Canadian magazine Maclean's (March 19, 1955). Enjoy!





This man seems to be emitting a glow or aura of some kind.  Are these pills laced with plutonium?


Now with millions of tiny FLAVOR BUDS!


I can't help it. I never find kids in 1950s advertising cute in the slightest.


"Not quite as colourful as big game hunting maybe.... but I'm more the bridge-and-bowling  type anyway."


Taken on its own, this illustration looks like a bizarre fever dream.




I know this Cocker Spaniel is trying very hard to look regal, but it's still an odd choice for a whisky ad.


It's interesting to see the classic gin and tonic heralded as a novel craze.


What a strange contraption - I never knew such a thing existed.  A nickel rod that changes its shape when magnetized, which causes a diaphragm to vibrate, which creates sound waves that only rodents can hear, which get disrupted by the intruder, which sets off the alarm... wow!


What in Gods holy name is she holding?  It looks like flowers sprouting from a loaf of pumpernickel rye.


I love the space age names they gave things back then: "Radasonic" is fabulous.



"Gramp tweaked his moustache and puffed up his chest, 'YOU CAN BUY ADEQUATE WIRING ON TIME PAYMENTS - THROUGH ANY ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR!'"

Damn, Gramp.  Chill.


Whenever his daughter gets a man, she hangs an IPA banner from her porch.  What an amazingly insane tradition.



Well, that's all from 1955 Canada.  I hope you enjoyed it!



8 comments:

  1. Hey, I couldn't been that kid in the orange juice ad. If I'd been Canadian. As to what the woman in the raincoat is holding, I'd guess a chocolate easter egg.

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  2. Old ads were so damned wordy.

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    Replies
    1. You're quite correct. However, remember this was in an era when there was little other entertainment forms. TV was in its infancy, and all the electronic distractions didn't exist. I remember that it was a big deal getting a magazine in the mail. We'd pour through it and read (and re-read) everything. Marketers knew that so the ads were more wordy than today.

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    2. You're quite correct. However, remember this was in an era when there was little other entertainment forms. TV was in its infancy, and all the electronic distractions didn't exist. I remember that it was a big deal getting a magazine in the mail. We'd pour through it and read (and re-read) everything. Marketers knew that so the ads were more wordy than today.

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    3. No, they just didn't yet realize the power of simplicity and that people will buy ideas.

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  3. DiscoDollyDebSeptember 26, 2015

    Are we sure Rube Goldberg didn't invent that overly-complicated burglar alarm?

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  4. I noticed that the Bayer Aspirin ad only says "Aspirin". In Canada, Bayer never lost the trademark and only Bayer Aspirin can be marketed as Aspirin, with the familiar Bayer Cross next to it. In the US, Bayer lost its trademark in 1919, after World War I.

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  5. I remember Molson's Golden ads in the late 1970s or early 1980s. They campaign was basically you could forget anything but your case of Molson's Golden. A guy enters an apartment filled with cute college girls to retrieve his case of Molson's Golden he had there from the last tenant.

    Ah, the memories.

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